Early Spring Nutrition

  From late fall to spring, honey bees rely upon the food stores available in the hive. If adequately prepared for winter, the colony will be given the best chance at surviving the cold winter months. Once spring arrives, the colony is already in full brood rearing mode, building up the population for the coming...

Biosecurity

One of the key factors affecting colony loss is the presence of multiple pathogen and parasite loads, as well as the background levels of their infective agents within hive substrates, such as: wax, pollen, honey. Many pathogens can survive in hive substrate for multiple years, so beekeepers must adopt management practices that minimize disease spread....

Honey bee viruses

By Renata Borba and Emily Olson There are 18 known viruses that afflict honey bees. In strong healthy colonies, viruses at low levels typically do not cause major problems. However, when combined with co-stressors such as low access to adequate food sources, environmental conditions, or other diseases/pests, the effects are exacerbated and can lead to...

What’s in your Sugar?

By Lynae Ovinge Did you know there have been lawsuits about poor quality bee feed? A few months ago, I watched Dr. Rob Currie’s (of the University of Manitoba) presentation to the Manitoba Beekeepers Association on “The Importance of Quality Feed for Bees” which is available at www.manitobabee.org. I learned that in 1995 some “off-spec”...